Mild Steel.

Mild steel is the most common form of steel because its price is relatively low while it provides material properties that are acceptable for many applications, more so than iron. Low-carbon steel contains approximately 0.05–0.3% carbon making it malleable and ductile. Mild steel has a relatively low tensile strength, but it is cheap and malleable; surface hardness can be increased through carburizing.

Low-carbon steels suffer from yield-point runout where the material has two yield points. The first yield point (or upper yield point) is higher than the second and the yield drops dramatically after the upper yield point. If a low-carbon steel is only stressed to some point between the upper and lower yield point then the surface may develop Lüder bands. Low-carbon steels contain less carbon than other steels and are easier to cold-form, making them easier to handle.

Calculated reduction and annealing temperatures.

A new process to obtain ultrafine grained bulk steel is developed. Plain low-carbon steel sheet with martensite starting microstructure was simply cold-rolled by 50% and annealed. The specimens annealed at intermediate temperatures such as 773 K revealed the multiphased nano-structure and showed superior mechanical properties.

Thus to improve the Mechanical Properties, the calculation of reduction percentage and right temperatures and soaking time are extremely critical to get the desired results.

Hardening & Tempering of Steel Strips.

Hardening and Tempering is a thermal process that strengthens steel through a controlled heating and cooling process.
This process will result in improved mechanical properties and give a tougher more durable product. The hardening process involves heating the steel to above the critical temperature for the given grade and then rapidly cooling. Whilst this process achieves the highest mechanical stengths and hardness’s, steel in this condition is extremely brittle and therefore requires further treatment in the form of tempering. This consists of reheating the steel to a lower temperature and holding the steel at the given temperature for a given period of time. As with traditional annealing (used to soften steels) this process is conducted in an inert atmosphere to avoid oxidation.
The exact temperature and processing times vary with given grades of steel and the process is very specialized.